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A 501 C(3) NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION

Almost Home Dog Rescue of Ohio is an all volunteer, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that has rescued hundreds of dogs since our inception in 2003. 100% of all donations go directly to the care of our rescued dogs. Learn more about us ...

"All of his life he tried to be a good person. many times, however he failed. For after all, he was only human. He wasn't a dog."
-Charles M. Schulz

 

About Almost Home Dog Rescue of Ohio

12Almost Home Dog Rescue of Ohio, Inc., (AHDRO), was formed in December of 2003.

Our Mission
AHDRO’s mission is to provide homeless Collies and other family-friendly dogs a safe haven where they will receive medical care, nutrition, and love until an approved home is found; to reduce the number of unwanted pets by altering all dogs in our rehoming program; to educate the public about the importance of altering pets, and to promote the message that owning a pet is a lifelong commitment.

All AHDRO dogs are placed in the homes of approved volunteers until they are adopted into homes that have been carefully screened for placement. Upon intake into our program, each dog is examined by a veterinarian, and necessary treatment is administered, or a treatment plan is put into place.

Our History
Since its inception, AHDRO has rescued more than 845 dogs – both locally and from as far away as Alabama, Michigan, North Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia. AHDRO dogs are rescued from situations ranging from lack of care to neglect to starvation and abuse. AHDRO works hand in hand with animal shelters to save dogs slated for euthanasia, and those dogs are our top priority. Some of our dogs come from owners who, because of illness or other circumstances, are no longer able to care for their pet.

Since our inception, AHDRO has rescued, cared for, and adopted out Collies in need of special attention. We believe that every dog we bring to our rescue deserves our best efforts to provide a happy, healthy life, and we dedicate ourselves to ensuring that this happens.

AHDRO has rescued many heartworm-positive dogs, a 10-month-old with hip dysplasia that required hip replacement surgery, another 10-month-old with congenital heart problems that has had successful heart surgery, and a four-year-old Collie with PDA (patent ductus arteriosus) that also had successful heart surgery. We have treated two Collies suffering from eye anomalies. We rescued a dog with a broken leg that required surgery to attach a plate to her femur and have developed the Molly Fund in her name to help with future large medical expenditures. Additionally, among our rescues are three blind and deaf Collies now living joy filled lives.

SanctuaryOur Future
We will continue this mission and build upon it as we work toward expanding our education programs. We are deeply proud of our accomplishments. Our lives are bettered by continuing to love the dogs we bring to rescue and by doing the work necessary to achieve our goals.

AHDRO takes those that we are able to rescue and gives them the chance they’ve never had. As a result, in addition to our healthy dogs, we are oftentimes caring for a dog that requires long-term attention.

We provide a safe and caring environment for all the dogs we rescue, and do whatever is necessary to enable them to become healthy, carefree dogs that, in turn, become beloved pets, living out their lives in peace and contentment. We want to save those that would be left behind, those that have medical issues, and those that are seniors, all of whom need a place to be safe until an adoptive home is available.

While our continued persistence and determination to rescue these dogs in need saves more than a hundred lives a year, we know we can not save every dog. The statistics are astounding:

  • Six to eight MILLION dogs and cats are relinquished to shelters each year.
  • Of these, three to four MILLION of those dogs and cats are euthanized in the U.S. each year.
  • This averages to one euthanasia every 8-9 seconds.

The only solution to this ongoing crisis is education.

We continue to work on our programming, and during the past year we have taken steps to bring several ideas to fruition. We have put a Senior Program into place. We have partnered with area companies to provide hands-on educational experiences. AHDRO volunteers have been guest speakers, explaining the importance of spaying and neutering. The registered veterinary technician on our board is writing educational medical articles for our newsletter. We plan to add a Humane Education Coordinator to our board and solicit volunteers to put the Humane Education program into place and present it to the public. We invite guest speakers to AHDRO general meetings to provide continuing education.

We have vision and great passion. Each step we take leads us to the next, and we are firm in our mission to provide a loving home for our dogs, extend that care to humans through our animals, and educate our children for the future.

The great pleasure of a dog is that you may make a fool of yourself with him and not only will he not scold you, but he will make a fool of himself too. - Samuel Butler

- See more at: http://almosthome.b2cmtsonline.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7&Itemid=11#sthash.IIbzzlO0.dpuf

AHDRO takes those that we are able to rescue and gives them the chance they’ve never had. As a result, in addition to our healthy dogs, we are oftentimes caring for a dog that requires long-term attention.

We provide a safe and caring environment for all the dogs we rescue, and do whatever is necessary to enable them to become healthy, carefree dogs that, in turn, become beloved pets, living out their lives in peace and contentment. We want to save those that would be left behind, those that have medical issues, and those that are seniors, all of whom need a place to be safe until an adoptive home is available.

While our continued persistence and determination to rescue these dogs in need saves more than a hundred lives a year, we know we can not save every dog. The statistics are astounding:

  • Six to eight MILLION dogs and cats are relinquished to shelters each year.
  • Of these, three to four MILLION of those dogs and cats are euthanized in the U.S. each year.
  • This averages to one euthanasia every 8-9 seconds.

The only solution to this ongoing crisis is education.

We continue to work on our programming, and during the past year we have taken steps to bring several ideas to fruition. We have put a Senior Program into place. We have partnered with area companies to provide hands-on educational experiences. AHDRO volunteers have been guest speakers, explaining the importance of spaying and neutering. The registered veterinary technician on our board is writing educational medical articles for our newsletter. We plan to add a Humane Education Coordinator to our board and solicit volunteers to put the Humane Education program into place and present it to the public. We invite guest speakers to AHDRO general meetings to provide continuing education.

We have vision and great passion. Each step we take leads us to the next, and we are firm in our mission to provide a loving home for our dogs, extend that care to humans through our animals, and educate our children for the future.

The great pleasure of a dog is that you may make a fool of yourself with him and not only will he not scold you, but he will make a fool of himself too. - Samuel Butler


Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened. - Anatole France